Start-ups, incubators and coworking in the tech world

I visited Campus London near Finsbury. It is a coworking space sponsored by Google and Central Working – well, that’s the cafe area. The rest of the complex is devoted to start-ups, fostering social enterprises, hosting events and courses that will equip entrepreneurs with skills and contacts necessary to launch themselves and their enterprises. The focus is on technology and digital industries but freelancers and designers are also welcomed into the fold. The space provides power outlets, toilets, outdoor space, tables, stools and chairs. WiFi is free and the cafe serves good coffee and food. No one is precious about mixing liquids with laptops – after all, you supply your own technology, so an incident becomes your problem.

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The day I worked in the space, it was packed. Around 100 people were working on their own projects and businesses – all day people came and went. Sometimes people helped each other with a bit of technical information or tips on running the business side of their enterprise, but in the main it had the intense and competitive feeling of a university library in the week before final exams – if your idea does not work, then you might lose out to the person across the room. Surprisingly, the noise level was quite tolerable but the constant movement around the cafe and toilets was distracting – people working in this area were always keeping an eye open for a vacant seat further down the room. There is no prebooking of facilities in this workspace – you just have to wing it every time you visit.

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Trend spotting in central London

Being in the centre of London has reminded me how cloistered the world of a teacher is during the workday. We may stay connected to the world through technology but are usually physically remote from the world that passes outside the school gates. Due to this isolation, teachers have not been part of the new ways of working that are evident in the heart of busy cities and urban areas. People are on the go. They do not need to wait inside their office block or sit behind a desk at their street address. Meetings are taking place in coffee shops, hotel foyers and temporary workspaces. People meet over their phones and laptops, and when the meeting is done, they can log straight back into their personal work tasks.

While this may generate too much multi-tasking and an even busier work schedule than ever, the trends have an element of dynamic energy that can engage people more actively in their work. Flexibility and a sense of choice over how to manage your tasks can give autonomy and a greater sense of independence in your work day. Obviously these trends do not suit all types of work, but they are rapidly becoming part of the way creatives and knowledge workers are doing business.

My hotel is a great example of the new style of design that blends living, holidaying and working into one environment. The entire property is serviced by effective WiFi connectivity. The decor is subdued but luxurious in terms of finish and fabric. The public areas flow into one another, so foyers can be meeting areas and corridors places to read or drink coffee. All the spaces have mulitple purposes and have only a few prompts to signal their primary function. The public areas are numerous and spread throughout the lower floors – however, within the spaces furniture is clustered into small groupings so that you can still maintain personal conversations or sit/work alone without being crowded by stangers. Lighting directs people to areas – brighter lighting for areas where the hotel wants you to sit, read, dine informally and more subdued lighting in areas where they want people to move through.

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